Bobby Jose - RE/MAX Welcome Home | Berkley, MA Real Estate, Lakeville, MA Real Estate


Simple mistakes can put your house in danger. Mistakes that, at first glance, seem to bear no weight, can also injure you or your children. Some of these mistakes are caused due to the fact that you are fatigued, emotionally charged or unaware. By becoming aware of the mistakes and oversights, you could extend the life of your home.

Avoid these hazardous habits at home

Your children and guests could also enjoy living in safety while they are inside your house. The first habit to avoid may surprise you. There’s probably not a person who hasn’t engaged in the habit at least once, especially if they are passionate about working in the kitchen.

Similar to not drinking and driving, avoid cooking when you are sleepy. Whether you are returning home from a long day of work or have expended yourself caring for and entertaining your children all day, you may be more tired and sleepy than you think. It is very easy to put a pot on the stove or to start sautéing meat, go sit down on the sofa and drift asleep. You might not wake up until you smell smoke or hear your fire alarm blaring. If you don’t have a fire alarm, by the time you wake up, your house could be in flames.

During a storm, turn all heating appliances off. This includes your stove, oven,electric fireplace and floor heaters. If a storm shuts down the power at your house for several hours, sending you to bed in complete darkness, you could believe that your house is safe only to wake up to a burning home once power is restored and your stove, oven, fireplace or a space heater turn back on and over heat. People have been burned out of their entire house because of this. Protect yourself by turning all heating appliances fully off if the power goes out.

These steps lead to greater home safety

Following on the above safety step, ensure that candles are completely out before you leave home or head to bed. A candle may appear to be out, yet still be simmering. Wind blowing into a window or air circulating through a room at your house could reignite a candle. If a piece of curtain, paper or another inflammable object catches the candle’s heat, a fire could start.

Only use approved space heaters. Never leave a space heater unattended. Also, ensure that someone is home while a fireplace, including an electric fireplace, is on. Keep flammable materials away from these heat resources.

Keep sharp objects in a safe place. Also, turn sauce pan and skillet handles inward. Both of these steps help to reduce the chances that someone will accidentally bump a hot pan or skillet or knife and get injured.

Pests, water erosion, and harsh weather storms aren’t the only events that can damage your house. The very habits that you engage in could also put your house at risk. Avoid the above mentioned habits to keep your house safe at the interior and exterior. For added protection, teach your children and guests to avoid the hazardous habits too.


When you're a homeowner, it's tempting to save money any way you can. Oftentimes people take repairs into their own hands when they don't have the knowledge or experience to complete the job safely. What begins as a way to save money can quickly turn into a disaster--as you spend lengthy periods of time on a project and find yourself going over your initial budget. It isn't always easy to know which projects you can attempt yourself and which ones are better left to the pros. And, of course, it will depend on your comfort and skill level when it comes to various household repairs. So, if you're a plumber, disregard our plumbing advice and dive in to your DIY plumbing projects since you have the know-how. But if you're an average homeowner looking to make some renovations and repairs, read on to find out which ones you should attempt and which ones are better left to the pros.

1. Electrical work

So you've got a few faulty outlets in the new home you bought. It doesn't seem worth calling in an electrician just for those few minor issues. However, due to the dangers and complications that can arise from electric work, it's a good idea to hold off and call in the experts. Aside from shocking yourself (which can be deadly), you could also create fire hazards or damage circuitry, resulting in much higher repair costs than you initially had. Another benefit of calling in an electrician, other than having the project done correctly, is that they will be able to diagnose your home circuitry to let you know what other problems might arise in the foreseeable future. So, when it comes to power issues, always call in the pros.

2. Hazardous materials

Many people will tell you not to worry about asbestos or lead paint unless you have children. However, these are both dangerous materials than can create several chronic health problems in adults as well. If you're concerned for the safety of yourself and your family, call in contractors who will remove the lead or asbestos. What can go wrong if you try to do it yourself? Lead chips and dust will fly through the air when attempting to remove lead paint. Breathing in these fumes is dangerous initially and down the road when the dust settles into the corners of your home. Asbestos, especially in blown-in insulation can be particularly dangerous. Aside from ensuring your safety, a contractor will also be able to assess the situation and determine whether your hazardous materials need to be removed or can just be "repaired" or covered up. Simple repair jobs on asbestos or lead-containing objects can save you some serious time and money.

3. Roofing and siding

There's a reason even building contractors bring in third party companies to install roofs and siding. These are both labor-intensive and time-intensive jobs that require specialized skills and tools that only dedicated companies can accomplish correctly. Roofing and siding are both dangerous jobs that carry the risk of falling off of roofs and ladders, as well as injuring your back lifting heavy shingles. The pros have the tools and experience to avoid these injuries. When you hire the professionals to do your roofing or siding, you can rest assured that the job is done correctly and will last much longer than if you made it a DIY project as well.

As happens in any industry, there are professionals who work in the real estate industry who don't mind cutting corners. Protections against working with inexperienced realtors and mortgage brokers comes through local and state realtor licensing requirements.

You may not be real estate savvy, but you deserve to be heard

The realtor licensing requirements vary from state to state, but generally mandate that realtors complete educational training and pass a state approved licensing examination. Ethical and legal issues may be covered during the training. What training seminars, study guides and tests may not give realtors are strong communication skills.

A study guide may not show realtors how to respect mortgage borrowers and house hunters. This training may fall into your lap. To be effective when dealing with realtors and mortgage brokers, you need to be confident. When you are confident while house hunting, you can increase the likelihood that you will:

  • Search for houses that fit within your financial range (confidence can help you to communicate to realtors the importance of not wasting your time and only showing you houses that are below your maximum budget)
  • Avoid giving into realtor or mortgage broker requests to buy houses that have amenities that you don't really want or need
  • Stick to looking for houses that are located in areas that match your personal tastes
  • Get the chance to buy houses that your entire family will appreciate (this means that you won't be talked into buying a house that may be great for adults but injury provoking for children)
  • Steer clear of attending open houses where former pet owners lived if you don't want to live in a house that was once home to several dogs or cats
  • Receive a thorough explanation of each expense associated with owning a house. For example, if you're confident, you could clearly and respectfully communicate to a realtor that you want all costs associated with a house to be level with or below your budget. In this case, expenses like your mortgage principal and interests, homeowners association fees,closing costs, broker fees, title fees and loan fees and insurances will not exceed your maximum budget.
  • Work with a realtor who takes the initiatives to update you on the status of the house shopping process.

House hunter confidence yields its own rewards

Reliable and respectable realtors and mortgage brokers are honest. They value house hunters and borrowers, whether these adults are their clients or not. They research directories, conduct smart marketing for their clients and look for quality houses that match their clients' requests. Sharp realtors and mortgage brokers aren't pushy or demanding. They listen to their clients.

If they exhibit enough respect and self-confidence, smart house hunters could help to sharpen realtors and increase their chances of working with realtors who find them houses that they will afford and appreciate. They could also help realtors gain the very skills that strengthen and lengthen realtor careers, skills like active listening, focused question asking, thorough research and welcomed communication skills.


Homeowners insurance is necessary, but that doesn't mean you should be forced to pay an exorbitant amount for it. Instead, you can take advantage of the following money-saving tips to lower your monthly homeowners insurance premiums: 1. Bundle Your Homeowners and Auto Insurance. In many cases, you can bundle your homeowners and auto insurance to save money. This will allow you to cut costs and leverage the same insurance company for both your homeowners and auto insurance policies as well. If you already have auto insurance and are looking for home insurance for your new residence, be sure to discuss your plans with your auto insurer. By doing so, you may be able to bundle your homeowners and auto insurance and lower your insurance premiums for years to come. 2. Explore All of the Options at Your Disposal. When it comes to finding homeowners insurance, there are plenty of fish in the sea. Thus, you're sure to discover many great options at your disposal, all of which you should explore before you decide on a homeowners insurance provider. With homeowners insurance, you should try to conduct plenty of research. And remember, the most affordable option may not be the best option based on your homeownership needs. Therefore, homeowners who do their homework will be able to review all of the options at their disposal and make an informed decision about their homeowners insurance. 3. Exclude Land Value from Your Homeowners Insurance Policy. Your homeowners insurance may include the value of your land as well as your residence. In this scenario, you may want to consider removing the land value from your policy. With homeowners insurance, you'll want to ensure that your residence and its contents are fully covered. That way, these items can be replaced if they are damaged. On the other hand, you may not need replacement coverage for your land. Before you exclude land value from your homeowners insurance, however, you'll want to discuss the pros and cons of doing so with an insurance agent. This professional will be able to outline how much money you can save by making this change, along with the short- and long-term ramifications of this decision. 4. Increase Your Deductible. Boosting your homeowners insurance policy's deductible likely will result in a drop in your monthly premium. At the same time, it is important to consider the trade-off that takes place if you make this change to your policy. A higher deductible means that you'll be required to pay more out of pocket if and when a claim is filed. As such, you should weigh the immediate cost savings versus the long-term value of increasing your deductible before you finalize your decision. Homeowners insurance can be tricky to understand, but insurance agents can help you discover the best ways to lower your monthly premiums. Ask your insurance agent for help with your homeowners insurance, and ultimately, you can work with this professional to find solutions to help you save money on your insurance premiums.

There are dozens of factors to consider when shopping for a new home -- ranging from property taxes and school district quality to square footage and roof condition. As you may be discovering, balancing your priorities and meeting your family's needs can be an overwhelming process! What's Important to You? While just about everyone factors in daily commuting distance in their decision, other key needs and considerations are often overlooked. There's certainly no "one size fits all" strategy for picking the perfect house, but getting your thoughts down on paper is a good starting point. If you have children or are expecting new arrivals in the near future, your priorities will be a lot different than someone at a later (or earlier) stage in life. For example, you might want to research local hospitals to identify the best maternity care options. Being close to public parks, playgrounds, and nursery schools would also be highly desirable for young families. Depending on your lifestyle, you might also prefer a home that's not too far from restaurants, concert venues, and movie theaters. If physical activity and sports are a big part of your life, then nearness to golf courses, tennis courts, and hiking trails might be worth considering. Other Convenience Factors You may have noticed in perusing real estate ads that many of them mention proximity to major highways, public transportation, and local airports. Whether your goal is to explore the region or simply navigate your way to doctors' appointments, job interviews, shopping centers, or business meetings, access to a variety of transportation options can make life a lot less stressful. By clarifying the features and conveniences in a home that are most important to you, your overall satisfaction with your final choice will be a lot higher. That's not to say that you shouldn't stay somewhat flexible in your requirements. Virtually all real estate purchases involve a few trade-offs and compromises. For example, if an urban lifestyle appeals to you, then a two-car garage and large backyard are probably not going to be part of the package. As far as the actual layout and design of your living space, key features which could make your daily routine easier are a first-floor laundry room, spacious closets, and easy-to clean, energy-efficient windows. For some people, the ideal home may include a rec room, a workshop, and a home office. A lot depends on your past experiences, your goals, and your personal passions. Having the ability to predict future needs will be invaluable in choosing a home that you and your family will be delighted with for years to come. Comparing Features and Amenities When you stop and think about your "wish list," your "must haves", and the dozens of property features you'll be evaluating, it underscores the importance of being methodical and organized. If those two qualifies are not among your personal strengths, don't worry! Your real estate agent can provide you with guidance, checklists, and day-to-day help in evaluating and comparing the many property choices available to you.



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